Genesis Lesson 25 Day 3

Genesis Lesson 25 Day 2,Genesis Lesson 25 Day 3,Genesis Lesson 25 Day 4,Genesis Lesson 25 Day 5

Genesis Lesson 25 Day 3

Genesis 41:33-57

Joseph rises to power.

7) Joseph and Pharaoh respond to God’s revelation.

Joseph makes recommendations

  • Select a wise and discerning man.
  • Put him in charge of Egypt.
  • Appoint supervisors over the land to collect a fifth of the harvest during the seven good years.
  • Store up grain under Pharaoh’s control for food in the cities during the seven years of famine.

Pharaoh and all his servants approve of Joseph’s plan.

So Pharaoh asked his servants,

“Can we find anyone like this—a man who has Ruach Elohim in him?”. . . “Because Elohim has let you know all this, there is no one as wise and intelligent as you. You will be in charge of my palace, and all my people will do what you say. I will be more important than you, only because I’m Pharaoh. . . . I now put you in charge of Egypt.” (Genesis 41:38-41 NOG)

Pharaoh removed his signet ring and put it on Joseph’s finger, dressed him in fine linen robes and put a gold chain around his neck. He rode in Pharaoh’s second chariot. Men ran in front of the chariot shouting, “Make way!” [or bow the knee!] “Abrek, probably an Egyptian word, similar in sound to the Hebrew word meaning to kneel.5

Pharaoh also renamed Joseph, Zaphnath-Paaneah, which is probably Egyptian for God speaks and He lives, and he gave him a pagan wife, the daughter of the priest of On.

On was a famous religious center dedicated to the worship of the sun-god. Joseph’s promotion unfortunately included a pagan marriage. There is no indication, however, that he abandoned faith in Yahweh.5

Outcome

“Joseph left Pharaoh’s presence and went throughout all the land of Egypt.”

In one day, he was freed from prison, cleaned up, promoted to Prime Minister of Egypt, dressed in royal robes and gold, married, and given an ancient version of a Rolls Royce, and servants.

8) God prepared Joseph for this exalted position.

Spiritual legacy

Jacob, no doubt, shared all of his God-dreams and encounters in great detail with Joseph and the stories about Abraham and Isaac. Jacob took special interest in Joseph, the son of his old age with his beloved wife, Rachel.

Groomed as the heir

As Jacob’s designated heir, he trained and trusted Joseph to manage the flocks and his entire estate. Even though Joseph was intelligent and had a knack for business management, he lacked people skills.

Dreams

God further revealed Joseph’s future position and identity through two dreams. When he shared them with his family, they mocked him for such a blatant display of arrogance. Even his father questioned him about it. None of them believed it, but Joseph had those dreams to hold onto during his years of suffering.

Developing relationship with God and godly character

Joseph’s thirteen years as a slave, stripped of his princely position, then falsely accused and imprisoned, greatly humbled him.

Because he had no one but God to turn to, it’s likely he prayed. We don’t read that he had God encounters like his predecessors, but he certainly pondered all the stories and promises of the families’ covenant with God.

The first mention of Holy Spirit coming on a man refers to Joseph in this passage. Pharaoh “could see it in his character, in his message, in his knowledge, in his wisdom, and in his humility.”1

Training to reign

From managing his father’s flocks, Joseph applied what he learned to become the overseer of Potiphar’s estate.

Potiphar was a government official, so he learned about his affairs.

In prison, his skills expanded as he was placed in charge of the whole facility. When two of Pharaoh’s servants were imprisoned, Joseph was placed in charge of them. He learned even more about Pharaoh and the workings of his staff and the palace.

My question—Why was Joseph so different?

I’ve pondered why Joseph always prospered, did not grow bitter and despondent in captivity, and avoided a huge temptation.

God didn’t forget Joseph. Promotion and advancement is from the Lord (Psalm 75:6-7).

King David, as close as he was to God, gave into temptation. He grew up the least of his brothers. Jewish tradition says he didn’t have the same mother. Scripture says his complexion was different. Tradition says he was born from an affair or perhaps his mother was a servant.

David spent all his time in the field and when Samuel asked for all of Jesse’s sons, he didn’t even call David. So, David grew up as the least instead of the greatest.

Did Joseph excel because he knew his identity and destiny? I think so.

Certainly, Joseph was intellectually gifted, had a pleasing manner, and was very attractive.

While God used those attributes, every opportunity came because God did not forget Joseph.

This event would set up the fulfillment of the dreams Joseph had many years before.

9) Practical steps

If we desire to fulfill our God-given destiny, He will prepare us and create the opportunities.

Many of us will fulfill our destiny without realizing it, I think.

(But I don’t like that. I want to know.)

10) God’s goodness and wisdom

Unlike Joseph, I lack a sense of identity and destiny.

I feel restless because so many things I thought were direction from God seem like they have not worked out. So I don’t know if I was wrong or if I just need to be patient.

Whether I’m right or wrong, I need to continue to pray, be patient and remember my answer to #9.

 



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RESOURCES

1 EnduringWord.com used by written permission.
2 AWM Living Commentary used by written permission.
3 Unless otherwise indicated, all Scripture quotations from *The ESV Bible® (The Holy Bible, English Standard Version®) copyright © 2001 by Crossway, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. Used by permission. All rights reserved.
4 Strong’s Concordance, public domain.
5 *Spirit Filled Life Bible®copyright © 1991 by Thomas Nelson, Inc. (The Holy Bible, New King James Bible) copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.

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